Tasmanian Premiere Date Announced

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Tasmanian Premiere Date Announced

The people of Tasmania have spoken, and we listened. After much demand for a Tasmanian premiere, we have set a date and are teaming up with the Cradle Mountain Film Festival on March 30th to bring you a very special screening of The Laps Tasmania.

The Cradle Mountain Film Festival will celebrate its fifth year running and The Laps Tasmania is among good company, with a plethora of other great films on the schedule including Oscar-winning documentary Free Solo.

The Laps Tasmania will screen at the Cradle Mountain Hotel at 3:30pm on March 30th. Tickets are $17, or you can attend the screening with the purchase a full festival pass.

Get your tickets below.

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The Laps: Tasmania, Official Selection at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival 2019

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The Laps: Tasmania, Official Selection at the Santa Barbara International Film Festival 2019

We are beyond thrilled to announce that The Laps: Tasmania documentary has been officially selected to host its US Premiere and screenings at the prestigious Santa Barbara International Film Festival in Santa Barbara, from January 30 - February 9, 2019.

The Laps: Tasmania

How can we consume less? Live our dreams? Meet new friends? Adventure more? And have a bloody good time doing it? The Laps: Tasmania is a documentary, following Dustin Hollick and Rhian Slapp, two ordinary fathers with the survival skills of well-trained house pets, on a two-week LAP around Tasmania with not much more than the clothes on their backs.

The rules are simple: No cash, no car, no technology and just 10 personal items each. These scruffy surfers from the East Coast of Australia leave home to learn the secrets of a well-balanced life and aim to get back a connection with nature that has been lost with the advent of modern convenience. They re-connect with nature, but it is the goodwill and generosity of the quirky humans that inhabit this remote island that make their journey and survival possible.



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Directed by Angie Davis and Dustin Hollick.

Screening times and location to be announced soon.

For more information, visit the official SBIFF website: http://sbiff.org/

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Understanding the Apex - Part 3

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Understanding the Apex - Part 3

Understanding the Apex

Part 3 - Brooke's story.

By Brooke Mason - Surfer

Instagram @brookiemason

Photo: Matt Draper @mattdraperphotography

Photo: Matt Draper @mattdraperphotography

Tasmanian surfer Brooke Mason had been living in Byron and was in the water next to Tadashi Nakahara on the morning of his attack.

Brooke on the morning of Tadashi's attack.

Brooke on the morning of Tadashi's attack.

Tadashi had just got barrelled right in front of me about five minutes before the attack, and I claimed it for him “yewwww!”. He was a super smiley guy and a good surfer I remember thinking he really kicks out his back foot on his turns and that's what I was trying to do. It was sunny and super fun, consistent surf with enough waves for everyone and there was hardly anyone out. I was just pinching myself thinking this place is heaven.

I watched Tadashi get dragged under about 20 meters from me, in a lull between the sets…He didn't make a sound just looked shocked and went under. I thought he initially went under for a swim, but his board had gone too and then there was all this blood. I got on my board with my arms and legs up in the air and was frozen to the spot. I told myself “if he comes up I'll go over there” but everything in my body was paralysed and I was just looking at the blood and the bubbles.

He didn't come up and I looked around me and everyone was paddling in super quietly and with as little splashing possible and I followed them until I was in waist deep water and looked around and one really brave guy was dragging Tadashi in. I took the guy next to me's board and he went to help them. I could see that Tadashi had lost his legs so I got the leg ropes off both boards to tourniquet his legs. Paddling in I was just waiting for it (the shark) to chomp my legs; it felt like a war zone and like everyone was going to die. I couldn't believe it when everyone was there at the beach and the bad luck for Tadashi that the shark happened to go for him. I've imagined the whole thing a million times and how many different ways it could have ended and it just came down to chance.

I haven't surfed Ballina since, it seems like the odds are way too dangerous there at the moment in my head, like a piece of bait, but hopefully that will settle down. I love crowds for the first time in my life! I think I'd prefer snapper with 1,000 people for a while. Something definitely has to be up. I honestly think that yes there are more people in the water but also the sharks are coming in because we have over-fished their ocean and so we give them no choice to come in closer to find a meal. Also with advances in technology you hear about every shark attack in a matter of hours and so it feels like there are more of them but maybe the information is just more accessible.

Brooke doing what she loves the most.

Brooke doing what she loves the most.

*Brooke has since returned to her homeland Tasmania where she is studying medicine and continues to surf.

To be continued - Part 4 - The Science.

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Understanding the Apex - Part 2

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Understanding the Apex - Part 2

Understanding the Apex

Part 2 - Dustin's story

By Dustin Hollick - Surfer + Writer + Filmmaker

Instagram @dustohollick

Photo: Matt Draper @mattdraperphotography

Photo: Matt Draper @mattdraperphotography

It felt weird to turn around and walk back up the beach with perfect waves rolling through un-ridden in the background. The back of my wetsuit was sweaty from standing on the hot sand for an abnormally long amount of time.

The helicopter hovering overhead had by far the best view of the whole scene. Confused beachgoers milling around the foreshore; a gravel car park full of spectators and two boats. An Aluminum runabout further out and smaller zodiac closer in just behind the breakers.

A deckhand on the small zodiac was throwing a very large baited hook out repeatedly to try and catch the shark that was causing the commotion. The mission was to tag and release. Within 10 minutes the shark was hooked and dragged out to deeper waters to be worked on. I wondered how they would get the hook out…

Even after the shark was hooked and dragged further out to sea I didn’t go out for a surf. And despite the fact I have been surfing regularly and trying to rely on my instincts to warn me of any pre-imminent danger, this was just the latest in a series of events that have caused me to ponder: “just what has changed?”

"...despite the fact I have been surfing regularly and trying to rely on my instincts to warn me of any pre-imminent danger, this was just the latest in a series of events that have caused me to ponder: just what has changed?” - Dustin Hollick. Photo: Angie Davis

"...despite the fact I have been surfing regularly and trying to rely on my instincts to warn me of any pre-imminent danger, this was just the latest in a series of events that have caused me to ponder: just what has changed?” - Dustin Hollick. Photo: Angie Davis

Of course there are plenty of sharks in the ocean, and yes the area we live in is abundant with marine life, what scientists call a “healthy” part of the ocean. So why, if there is abundant marine life in our corner of ocean here, are surfers, swimmers, and body-boarders suddenly on the menu? I don’t have the answers to this question but there are many theories being put forward.

Dustin at home, enjoying his time in the ocean. Photo: Angie Davis

Dustin at home, enjoying his time in the ocean. Photo: Angie Davis

Personally I will continue surfing, I surfed twice today, and I get too grumpy if I don’t surf. But until we get some answers as to why the sharks are trying to feed on us or about the oceanic climate changes, or until some preventative measures are put in place, I will not let my four and seven-year-old boys surf or swim in the ocean. I believe after my 25 plus years spent in our Earth’s marine environment I should be able to recognize any signs of danger and react in time; if not my life has been amazing and I have no regrets. But to see a young child get mauled would not be a good thing at all. It’s sad that the ocean in this area has lost its innocence for so many beach goers; I hope we find some solutions soon.

Dustin having a chat between sets with Kelly Slater at Ballina's Northwall Beach, location of the controversial eco shark net system that was set to be installed this month but has been delayed.

Dustin having a chat between sets with Kelly Slater at Ballina's Northwall Beach, location of the controversial eco shark net system that was set to be installed this month but has been delayed.

To be continued - Part 3 - Tadashi's attack from the eyes of Brooke Mason.

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Understanding the Apex - Part 1

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Understanding the Apex - Part 1

Recently we published a feature article 'Understanding the Apex' in Japanese surf + lifestyle magazine: BLUE.

The issue has been so well received in Japan, so we're going to share it with you in a blog-series here on The Switchboard Network blog.

We took on the piece after Angie witnessed the death of Tadashi Nakahara from a bite sustained to both legs whilst surfing here in Lennox Head/Ballina. The article was a way for us to search for answers on the blow-up of shark activity here on the north-east coast of Australia, and collate a number of opinions and science on the subject. We welcome your comments and opinions below.

Understanding the Apex

Part 1 - Angie's story.

By Angie Davis - Surfer + Writer + Filmmaker

Instagram @angelahelendavis

Photo: Matt Draper @mattdraperphotography

Photo: Matt Draper @mattdraperphotography

The sun had well and truly risen when I arrived to the top car park at Speeds, in East Ballina, after dropping my kids at school and day care. It was one of those memorable end-of-summer mornings, where the sun is shining bright and the only wind a moderate offshore helping head-high clean peeling A-frames reel in over the shallow reef and adjacent sand banks. Instead of going straight to my car boot to get changed, grab my board and head into the surf, I couldn’t help but want to nab a quick iPhone photo to throw up on Instagram to tease my followers. When I held my phone up to take a wide shot, I was shocked at what I saw through the lens; what seemed like an injured, unconscious surfer being carried in over the rocks, his head limp between the arms of two male surfers carrying out the apparent rescue.  

Speeds, shortly after the attack. A beautiful part of the Lennox/Ballina region. Photo: Angie Davis

Speeds, shortly after the attack. A beautiful part of the Lennox/Ballina region. Photo: Angie Davis

Adjusting my eyes now to the frantic scene unfolding below, I noticed a trail of blood following the path of the rescue attempt and saw the injured surfer’s legs were missing from above the knee. Horrified, I knew instantly the cause of the injury, a shark attack. As I ran down to the shore other surfers were screaming out to call an ambulance, which I did as the surfers finally got the victim to the beach, with others pulling off their leg ropes to tourniquet the victim’s legs in an attempt to stop the bleeding. The group rallied together and CPR was started immediately, while I stayed on the phone to the ambulance urgently requesting their assistance at the scene.

Just metres away, innocent young families who had been out basking in the sun and frolicking in the adjacent natural rock pools were witnessing something not quite short of a horror film. It took a good half hour for the ambulance to arrive, and as the team of brave surfers continued with revival attempts I began to familiarize myself with the lifeless face lying on the beach at our feet…Tadashi Nakahara.

Tadashi was well known in the community, a friend of my ex-husband’s, and someone I had shared fun waves with in the past. A hard worker who always wore a warm smile, Tadashi was respected in and out of the water and his death rocked the community. For those of us at the scene, we would each take that day into our nightmares.

Angie consoling a friend and member of the Japanese surfing community at the scene of Tadashi's attack.

Angie consoling a friend and member of the Japanese surfing community at the scene of Tadashi's attack.

Tadashi's memorial service at Lighthouse Beach, Ballina, NSW.

Tadashi's memorial service at Lighthouse Beach, Ballina, NSW.

I personally tried to view the day as a one-off, very unlucky “wrong time wrong place” incident, but as the months went on and our local waters were tainted with more shark attacks, it became apparent that the surf was not as safe as we hoped, and changes in our local environment were resulting in a massive increase of sharks, particularly Great Whites, and encounters with humans. In an attempt to understand what is going on, I decided to chat with a number of local surfers to gauge their opinions, and correlate professional data and research from shark experts and marines scientists. The result is this feature, which I hope will shed some light on our current marine environment here in Byron, Lennox Head and Ballina, and a greater understanding of Great Whites and their behavioural patterns.

Angie surfing later in the year at Northwall, Ballina. Photo: Matt Tibbey.

Angie surfing later in the year at Northwall, Ballina. Photo: Matt Tibbey.

*Out of respect we have chosen not to publish a photograph of Tadashi Nakahara. We remember him in our hearts as a positive, cheerful, enthusiastic member of the community. His last wave on this Earth was a barrel.

To be continued - Part 2 - Dustin's story. 

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EDGEtv influencers

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EDGEtv influencers

Super stoked to be picked up as EDGEtv influencers, sharing our journeys as storytellers creating conscious content on the  human condition and environment at large.

Check out our profiles below and give EDGEtv a follow; these guys have some amazing things in the pipeline for 2016 and are already reaching over 14 million households in the USA alone.

http://www.edgenow.tv/dustin-hollicks-edge/

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Alison's Adventures Maldives and Double Barrel Film

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Alison's Adventures Maldives and Double Barrel Film

Three in a row! Another sellout premiere of Double Barrel, this time screening again on home soil in Byron Bay at the Patagonia store, hosted by Glen Casey.

We were very honoured to have Alison Teal from Discovery Channel's Naked and Afraid, in the store also for the evening to host her Australian premiere of Alison's Adventures Maldives, an insight into the forbidden 'Trash Island'.

It was a fantastic night celebrating environmental education through film, and females in the screen industry. Watch Alison's film in full below:

Very special thanks to Glen Casey and Patagonia Byron Bay, Stone and Wood Brewery, Alison's Adventures, and all of you who continue to support Double Barrel as it tours around the world.

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Double Barrel screenings selling out on the Australian East Coast

Following two sell out premieres on the Australian East Coast, Double Barrel is returning to Byron Bay again by popular demand, showing at the Patagonia Byron Bay Store on Friday March 18th.

This very special night will feature a double film night with Alison's Adventures Maldives, where Discovery Channel's Naked and Afraid star Alison Teal returns to the Maldives to document the forbidden 'Trash Island'.

The event is FREE but Numbers are strictly limited, and attendance is RSVP only, to angie@switchboardmedia.com.au.

The second screening comes off the back of two sellout premieres at Stone and Wood Brewery and Surf World Gold Coast, where the film was shared alongside a special Peruvian delegation cultural tour, with three Peruvian surfing world champions and the Peruvian Ambassador in attendance. A traditional reed boat was on presentation after being the first of its kind to be built on Aussie shores with reeds imported from Peru, and surfed from Bondi to Noosa as part of the cultural tour.

Save the Waves Coalition boss Nick was also in attendance, and congratulated us on a great film. After having just inducted the Gold Coast into the World Surfing Reserve program, we encourage the team at Save the Waves to consider Lobitos in the near future!


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